As a creative professional offering online interior design services, there is no right or wrong fee to charge for your services. Since you're the one who decides the value of your time, expertise, and particular unique skills, what you want to charge is ultimately up to you. While there are different ways to approach and present your fees for your online interior design services, it typically comes down your per hour fee. Here’s a look at three ways to present your fees; each of these can include various options that each offer additional services.

Per-Room fee

This rate for your online interior design services can include redesigning an already-existing room, creating the initial design of a room, design revisions, a Moodboard, a 3D Photoshop Board, a shopping list, and/or shopping services.

 

Hourly-to-a-Budget fee.

This option enables you to share your hourly rate with your client and combine that with his/her budget. Once your time and services get close to the estimated budget, you can then let your client know that the budget will need to be increased in order to meet the online interior design services requested.

 

Per-Square-Foot Fee

When working with developers on larger projects, charging a flat fee based on the square footage of the space is a good compromise to an hourly rate. For example, you might charge $3 sq./ft. for the full space planning design of a 10,000 sq./ft. space. If, however, an architect is handling most of the design and you're being hired to focus on the space’s finishes, then you might charge $1.50 sq./ft. If you’ll need to collaborate and meet with several department reps or work on several different rooms within that 10,000 sq./ft. space, your fees would be higher.

 

Just like every other creative professional role – from portrait painters, sculptors, and glassblowers, to landscape architects and writers – interior designers also have the responsibility of deciding what to charge for their time, expertise, and unique talent. While there are numerous options on how to calculate the fee for your professional services, it ultimately comes down to one thing for each project you take on: your mindset as you work with the client and on the project. If you find that a client is demanding more of your time beyond what you deem reasonable or if a client is constantly making changes as you attempt to bring the initial design to fruition, these scenarios will not frazzle you in the least bit if you charged enough for your services. You’ll just consider these nuances of the client as part of the profession. If you undercharged, however, and don’t feel that you are being fairly compensated for your services, it will be difficult for you to enjoy the process and the project. Unless you are seeking to secure a project strictly to include it in your portfolio (and are thus willing to do it for less than what you would want to get compensated), always charge what you know your expertise is worth.